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gyaan.in was shut down on 24th September 2013. Thanks to the entire community which made this journey so awesomeballs. Read more.
Gyaan Dose: 11th April 2013
  • Today's gyaan dose is about Margaret Thatcher, the famed former British Prime Minister who died this week. Thatcher is often referred to England's Iron Lady. But she is also often referred to as the "Milk Snatcher" Well, that isn't a very pleasant name to be called. And here's the story behind it:

    After the second world war, the Education Act (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edu...) was introduced to make sure all children had the basic nutrition to keep healthy. Many families were living in very austere times and rationing was still enforced. This act meant every child in Britain was guaranteed milk and at least one hot meal a day. 

    When Margaret Thatcher was made Secretary of State for Education and Science children up to the age of 11 (in first and middle school) used to still get free milk at school. 

    This was drunk from mini milk bottles, containing a third of a pint of milk and drunk through straws. 

    image

    Margaret Thatcher cut this age to 7 years old, which is how she got the nickname 'The Milk Snatcher' as basically she is perceived to be taking milk out of the hands of children.

    By Quora user: Tatiana Estévez  
    You can read the complete answer on Quora, along with the author's own views on the matter of cutting the age to 7: http://qr.ae/TJ2hR
  • On a more current note: Bugatti Veyron has lost its title of the fastest car in the world: Here's Why:

    Veyron was stripped of the title by Guiness Book of World Records after a little known car maker by the name of Hennessey revealed that the car had its "Speed Limiter" deactivated, something that was against Guiness Book of World Record's guidelines. As of now, the record is held by a little known car named SSC Ultimate Aero, Here's a picture:

    image


    You can read the entire story published by the wired magazine over here: Wired Story